Photo courtesy of the Allen family

David Allen, center, died on April 30 after multiple motorists struck him in the road on Sand Point Way Northeast. Nearby residents are pushing to make that road safer by increasing lighting, lowering the speed limit and adding pedestrian and bicycle lanes.
Photo courtesy of the Allen family David Allen, center, died on April 30 after multiple motorists struck him in the road on Sand Point Way Northeast. Nearby residents are pushing to make that road safer by increasing lighting, lowering the speed limit and adding pedestrian and bicycle lanes.

On April 30, David Allen was struck and killed by two motorists while at an intersection on Sand Point Way Northeast.

Both motorists fled the scene, leaving Allen to die in the road near Seattle Children’s Hospital.

Detectives investigating the incident believe Allen fell into the southbound lanes of the road around 11:30 p.m. He was struck mid-block. Medics arrived and transported Allen to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Witnesses at the scene said the man was struck by two separate vehicles, neither of which stopped. Some witnesses then formed a barrier to prevent other cars from striking Allen as he lay in the road. Detectives are now reviewing evidence and working with the Medical Examiners Office to determine the victim’s cause of death.

Allen’s sister, Jessica Lewellen, has set up a modest GoFundMe account to pay for her brother’s funeral expenses.

“My little brother David was killed in a hit and run accident on April 30, 2018,” she wrote on the drive. “[He] would have been 30 on May 16. He was hit by two cars and both cars fled the scene. I am trying to come up with the funding to cremate my brother and spread his ashes where are mommas ashes were spread and have a small celebration of life for him. Anything helps...thank you.”

Donations can be given at https://www.gofundme.com/david-allen-rip-beautiful-soul.

Allen’s death has resparked a conversation about the safety of Sandpoint Way Northeast, in what has been described by residents and The Urbanist as the road’s “highway design.”

Lake City resident Daigoro Toyama said Allen’s death was “a very, very sad story.”

“This is yet another reason that safety improvements to [Sand Point Way] are long overdue and must happen quickly,” Toyama wrote.

Andres Salomon at The Urbanist wrote that Allen wasn’t the first victim of this stretch of road, and would likely not be the last.

“Sand Point Way is currently a deadly mix of high speeds, wide lanes, poor lighting, no bicycle facilities (despite Cascade Bicycle Club being headquartered there), and missing sidewalks,” he wrote on the nonprofit’s website. He continued with the Seattle Department of Transportation’s inaction. “The original proposal from SDOT included reduced speed limits, removal of unneeded travel lanes, a protected bike lane, signalized left-turn lanes, crosswalks with rapid-flash beacons or signals, and numerous other improvements. Unfortunately, it would appear that SDOT has largely scaled back that proposal. Gone are the lower speed limits, the removal of unnecessary travel lanes, and most everything else except for a few sidewalks and a single crossing improvement.”

The dark stretch of road where Allen spent his last minutes is a dangerous one. In the last year one other death and four serious injuries have taken place on Sand Point Way Northeast.