Darryl Havens, one of the original developers of Microsoft Windows and currently an engineer at Amazon, helps an APL student. Photo by Erin Brewer
Darryl Havens, one of the original developers of Microsoft Windows and currently an engineer at Amazon, helps an APL student. Photo by Erin Brewer
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A group of high school students from the Academy for Precision Learning (APL, 5031 University Way N.E., Suite 105) joined fellow high schoolers across the country on Dec. 7 in experiencing the Hour of Code based on content from Code.org.

APL is an independent K-12 school that provides individualized instruction for students across the autism spectrum alongside their typically developing peers. 

“These students demonstrate an incredible range of coding skills and knowledge — from students who are just being introduced to computer science to others who are already creating their own games and apps,” said Brad Porter, vice president and Distinguished Engineer at Amazon. “That’s the great thing about Code.org: They provide a range of content that all students can access and get engaged in real coding experiences.”

Technology professionals from Microsoft, Amazon and Seattle Children’s hospital, in addition to a computer science student from the University of Washington, gathered to launch a weeklong coding seminar for the APL students. Among them was Darryl Havens, one of the original developers of Microsoft Windows and currently an engineer at Amazon.

“I’m always interested in helping more students get interested in computer science,” he said. “Once you teach them how to code, it opens up a whole new world of possibilities for them.”

According to Lucas, an APL high school student, “My Dad does computer programming, and I’ve always been interested in coding. I’ve programmed many games in Minecraft already, and it gives me another thing to bond over with my Dad.”

For more information on APL, visit www.aplschool.org.

ERIN BREWER is vice president and co-founder of APL.